MOLOTOV'S DENIAL OF CIVILIAN BOMBINGS

The bombardment of Helsinki 1939-40 In response to representations made on December 1, by Mr. Laurence B. Steinhardt, Ambassador of the United States to the USSR, on behalf of President Roosevelt, protesting the alleged bombardment of civilians in Finland by Soviet airmen, Mr. Molotov made the following reply:

"Mr. Rooseveltís suggestion that air bombardment of the population of Finlandís towns should not be permitted, insofar as it is addressed to the Soviet Government, is caused by a misunderstanding. Soviet airplanes have bombed airdromes, but they have not bombed towns and do not intend doing so, because our Government values the interest of the Finnish population no less than any other Government does. Certainly one may fail to see this from America, which is over 8,000 kilometers away from Finland. Nevertheless, facts are facts. In view of this, Mr. Rooseveltís statement is, as can be seen, pointless."

Moscow' Daily News, December 4, 1939.


The text of the denial is from "War and Peace in Finland.". A documented survey. Soviet Russia Today, New York, 1940.

The photo of a bombed building (Technical University) in downtown Helsinki is from the book "Finlande 1940 ce que j'ai vu et entendu" by Col. Henry Valloton, former president of the Swiss National Council (Conseil National Suisse). Lausanne, 1940.

List of foreign journalists reporting from the Winter War.

A photoreport, titled "Marks of destruction in Helsinki", of an aerial bombardment of Helsinki in the magazine "Suomen Kuvalehti", nr. 50, 1939.

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